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The Wednesday Call with Andy Albright

The Wednesday Call with Andy Albright is a weekly program that is designed to help you grow and improve in business and life. Through simple yet effective teaching principles, Andy Albright helps people move from where they are to where they want to be in as little time as possible. If you are looking for an opportunity to change your life for the better, The Wednesday Call should be part of your weekly schedule. Through this show, Andy reveals all of his business and live strategies to help people see how they find a new career through National Agents Alliance and help people all across the United States at the same time. The Wednesday Call helps people learn how to make a living working as little or as much as they choose to each week. This program originates from NAA headquarters in Burlington, N.C. where Andy Albright, who co-founded NAA in 2002, was born and raised. Special guests appear on the show regularly and include successful business minds, athletes, entrepreneurs and people making an impact in a number of different areas in the world. You’ll enjoy the podcast if you are an entrepreneur that is ready to explode in your professional career, enjoy hearing inspirational stories and messages from everyday people just like you, or maybe you are a lifelong learner who continually seeks growth and improvement in your life. Regardless of where you are, The Wednesday Call offers educational nuggets for new listeners and old. We hope you enjoy listening and keep coming back for more!
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Now displaying: July, 2020
Jul 29, 2020

On this episode of The Wednesday Call podcast, Mike and Noelle Lewantowicz give you the exclusive chance to hear from top, growing agents with The Alliance. 

From building their own lineup and coaching their team, to hitting new production numbers, they have figured out how to execute the plan quickly. Learn how they've done it and how you can do it too!

www.AndyAlbright.com

@AndySAlbright

www.NAALeads.com

@NationalAgentsAlliance

@NAALeadsTheWay

#TheAlliance #N247RU

#DoTheDo

Jul 23, 2020

On this episode of The Wednesday Call podcast, Andy Albright comes to you live from his home in Treasure Island, Fla. to talk about what service means to being successful.

"Your attitude must be like my own, for I, the Messiah, did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give my life."

--Matthew 20:28

Moral: Being of service to something -- a person, a group, a community, a cause or a belief -- means that you have chosen to engage without expectation. The selfless act is then marked by a remarkable degree of maturity.

The 4 Behaviors of Service:

1. Acknowledge All Communication (Clarity and Listening).

2. Great Everyone with Enthusiasm (Upbeat Attitude and Vested Interest).

3. Ensure Commitment (Intentional Follow Through and Personal Dedication).

4. Show Mercy (Be the Samaritan and Be Full of Grace).

1. Acknowledge All Communication Quote: "A word to the wise is not sufficient if it doesn't make sense." --James Thurber

Moral: It is the place or responsibility of knowledge to speak with clarity and it is the privilege or right of wisdom to listen.

1. Acknowledge All Communication

Requires Two Things:

Clarity (through visibility and approachability). Downlines seek reliable service that is consistently available and pleasantly inviting.

Listening (being responsive and helpful). Uplines, who discover listening, will find that they are more able to build depth and width; and ultimately thrive more when they communicate quickly and effectively with their downlines.

2. Greet Everyone with Enthusiasm Quote:

"The success of a project is best predicted by the enthusiasm of its participant. So it is your job to make your enthusiasm contagious."  --Jonathan Lockwood Huie

Moral: A positive attitude makes everything in our business easier. An optimistic outlook will boost your team to stay on track, and will supercharge them to keep moving forward down that track. Servicing your team with enthusiasm is a small price to pay to get results.

2. Greet Everyone with Enthusiasm Requires Two Things:

Upbeat Attitude (being excited about what you can control and not sweating what you can't). The words that come out of your mouth are not just a reflection of what's in your brain --they are programming your brain how to think. Therefore, if you want to have a positive attitude, your vocabulary must be consistently positive. Refrain from using negative phrase such as: " I can't," and start saying: "I can."

Vested Interest (becoming devoted to the pursuit of another's goal with the fervor as if it is your own). If you look at something with a personal stake, it will cause your passion level for that something to increase.

3. Ensure Commitment Quote:

"When I say, I'll think about it. I really mean, I'll forget about it completely until you bring it up again." --Will Ferrell

Moral: How often are we guilty of telling someone we will think about it only to never think about it again? Maybe you have been guilty of telling someone, " I'll be praying for you," and forget about it the next second. If you really want to impress someone, don't fall into the trap of forgetting about it. Instead, be intentional about following through with what you said you were going to do.

3. Ensure Commitment

Requires Two Things:

Intentional Follow Through (purposely continuing to do something or think about its completion until you have contributed everything possible). You are being measured. Your ideal prospect is measuring your actions against your words. This isn't so much a moral judgment, and your prospect isn't trying to play a game of "gotcha." Your prospect is keeping score because your ability to keep your commitments and following up on your word, is the best indication of what they should expect as a future downline.

Personal Dedication (model commitment yourself to your upline). Failure to honor your own commitments is an indication of the hypocrisy in your leadership abilities. It's easy to talk the talk when it comes to asking others to execute and keep their promises, but it's much more difficult to walk the walk with your personal numbers.

4. Show Mercy Quote:

"No one would remember the Good Samaritan if he'd only had good intentions." -- Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher

Moral: Of course the Good Samaritan was a man in a story that helped an injured traveler that was beaten and left to die. Their likelihood of getting along and being friends was unlikely, yet the Samaritan did the right thing. We may quote scripture and recite quotes on love and God, but unless we are willing to get involved in the lives of others, we are just blowing smoke.

4. Show Mercy

Requires Two Things:

Be the Samaritan (As the scriptures say, he has compassion, but more importantly, he acted on it). The correlating message here is to get strong financially and stay strong financially, so we can have the means to act on our good intentions. Jesus concludes the parable with this admonition, "Go and do likewise."

Be Full of Grace (Giving blessings towards the non-befitting). Grace allows us to award voice to someone's truth that may be in conflict with your truth. Life gives us an abundance of blessings too numerous to count, which should awaken the realization that your happiness is interdependent with the happiness of others. This awakening is where sustainable service lives.

www.AndyAlbright.com

@AndySAlbright

www.NAALeads.com

@NationalAgentsAlliance

@NAALeadsTheWay

#TheAlliance #DoTheDo

#N247RU

 

Jul 15, 2020

On this episode of The Wednesday Call podcast, Andy Albright comes to you live from his home in Treasure Island, Fla. to talk about the four behaviors of respect.

Be tolerant and accepting

Be courteous

Rely on the facts

Show humility

"To be one, to be united is a great thing. But to respect the right to be different is maybe even greater." --Bono of U2

Moral: One of the best ways to show respect for someone is to truly listen and hear another's point of view. We should allow each other to have and express our own views -- regardless of whether we agree with them or not.

The 4 Behaviors of Respect:

1. Be Tolerant and Accepting (Empathy and Patience)

2. Be Courteous (Courtesy and Manners)

3. Rely on the Facts (Relative Perspective & Vast Experience)

4. Show Humility (Diplomacy and Professionalism)

1. Be Tolerant and Accepting Quote:

"Tolerance isn't about not having beliefs. It's about how your beliefs lead you to treat people who disagree with you." --Timothy Keller

Moral: Being accepting or showing empathy will determine your level of tolerance or having patience, which then affects your treatment of others.

This positive treatment of others creates the following three things: 1. Respect for myself. 2. Respect for others. 3. Respect for a belief system or company structure.

1. Be Tolerant and Accepting Requires Two Things:

• Empathy (Practicing acceptance). Do not judge another person until you have walked a mile in their shoes. During this process we must not only consider what they feel, but also recognize why they feel.

Empathy leads us to ask ourselves: "If I were in that person's situation, how would I want to be treated?" The treatment is the connecting bridge between empathy and respect.

• Patience (Showing tolerance). This is a process of relying on a fair and objective attitude (tolerance) toward those whose opinions and practices differ from one's own, which quickly produces a behavior of restraint to react (patience) to the bait of negativity.

2. Be Considerate Quote: "We must be as courteous to a man as we are to a good picture, which we are willing to give the advantage of good light." --Ralph Waldo Emerson

Moral: Being polite is giving people the benefit of the doubt through a courteous behavior. Being well-mannered is the evidence of a civilized nature. It is important to note that good manners must be the precursor to demonstrating courteous behaviors.

2. Be Considerate Requires Two Things:

• Courtesy (Practicing politeness). The enemy of courteous intentions is the concept of rudeness. Rudeness is the face of disrespect and is a weak person's imitation of strength. In order to avoid being considered rude, one must start behaving in a way that benefits the "collective we."

This is the very essence of courtesy -- considering the effect of your behavior on others. Individual commitment creates team activity.

• Manners (practicing civility). Manners have been called: "the shadows of our virtues." Manners (sometimes referred to as etiquette) is a way to pay reverence (respect) to existing and accepted social standards of decency.

Manners are the first step to morality (what's right), and etiquette (what's proper) is the first gesture of ethics. Manners cease to have meaning without morals and etiquette ceases to exist without morals. When combined, manners and etiquette create civility (valuing our difference by watching our tongues).

3. Rely on the Facts Quote: "Facts are stubborn things. " --John Adams

Moral: Whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or our passions, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence. The facts may get in the way of a good story, but when supported by a relative perspective and vast experience, facts become the story.

3. Rely on the Facts Requires Two Things:

• Relative Perspective (The idea that views are relative to difference in perception and consideration). Facts, in this case, form a perspective bridge between the opposing views, in order to create common ground (where we gain the individual realization that we are not the only human on earth, and there may be an alternate perspective also based on facts).

• Vast Experience (The soundness of an action or decision with regard to the application of wisdom). Wisdom is supported by two types of facts: 1. Knowledge facts (learned from documented evidence). 2. Good Judgment facts (learned from observed evidence).

4. Show Humility Quote: "We come nearest to great when we are great in humility." --Rabindranath Tagore

Moral: When you practice humility, you gain the respect of others more effectively. Humility is a practical trait that requires constant monitoring, especially since "arrogance" is always tugging at our human nature.

4. Show Humility Requires Two Things:

• Diplomacy (Demonstrating Tactfulness). Tact and diplomacy are skills centered around an understanding of other people and being sensitive to their opinions, beliefs and feelings. Effective use of such skills comes from being able to sense accurately what another person is feeling or thinking, and then responding with humility as to avoid bad feelings or awkwardness.

• Professionalism (Demonstrating Dignity). True professionalism, the kind needed throughout our lives, will only be found in those rare individuals that seek wise council, admit when they are wrong, and allow others to take the credit for success. A person without this type of humility risks intoxication by their own perceived importance. Not dignifying something with a response requires a professional mindset.

www.AndyAlbright.com

@AndySAlbright

www.NAALeads.com

@NationalAgentsAlliance

@NAALeadsTheWay

#TheAlliance #DoTheDo

#N247RU

 

 

Jul 8, 2020

On this episode of The Wednesday Call podcast, Andy Albright comes to you live from his home in Treasure Island, Fla. to give you four behaviors of accountability that lead to success. 

"He that is good for making excuses is seldom good for anything else." --Benjamin Franklin

Moral: Excuses provide the reasons to stop your forward motion. Once you stop, progress cannot be realized.

The 4 Behaviors of Accountability:

1. Be Self-Disciplined (Willpower & Habit)

2. Think Before You Act (Wise Decisions & Emotional Maturity)

3. Take Ownership of Your Choices (Proactive Posture & Taking Responsibility)

4. Be a Self-Starter (Being Persistent & Remaining Curious)

1. Be Self-Disciplined Quote:

"The difference between a successful person and others is not a lack of strength, not a lack of knowledge, but rather a lack of will." --Vince Lombardi

Moral: Will is the spearhead of self-discipline. It is a concentration of force. It is when you gather up all your energy and make a massive thrust forward. Life doesn't first require you to have the strength (self-worth) to rise up, nor does it require the knowledge (education) to understand as a prerequisite for forward motion. Instead, it requires that instinctive desire that exists inside each and everyone of us to take just one more step.

1. Be Self-Disciplined

Requires Two Things:

Willpower (Gives you the guts to stay engaged in a course of action). A personal choice to rise above one's circumstances and demonstrate the ownership for achieving desired results. Simply put: see it, own it and do it!

Habit (Gives you a way to fortify your position during the course of action). If willpower is your initial thrust to take that first beachhead of life, then habit allows you to sustain your effort by taking a little more territory each day in order to advance your position.

2. Think Before You Act Quote:

"Regret is unnecessary. Think about the consequences of both acting (avoiding a train wreck) or not acting (missing an opportunity)." --William Shockley

Moral: Thinking before you take action encompasses much more than basic brain processing; and is typically used to anticipate the possible outcomes of a situation, and make the best choice about what to do. When one thinks before acting they must begin with the end in mind.

2. Think Before You Act

Requires Two Things:

Wise Decisions (Every single decision you have ever made or will ever make has consequences). Once we learn to evaluate our decisions or lack of deciding based on consequences, all the other considerations and distractions fall neatly by the wayside.

Emotional Maturity (Have the confidence to be your own resource). The key is to be effective and not reactive.

Here's three questions you may want to keep handy:

1. What options do you have and can you image each one through?

2. What you would tell a friend in the same situation?

3. Would you mind explaining the aftermath of your decision to a large group of people?

3. Take Ownership of Your Choices Quote:

"He who cannot establish dominion over himself will have no dominion over others." --Leonardo da Vinci

Moral: If you cannot take accountability for your actions, you will never have influence with others.

3. Take Ownership of Your Choices

Requires Two Things:

A Proactive Posture (Only when you implement this strategy can you direct your own destiny; otherwise someone or something else gladly will). Being proactive is something you do to yourself, and not something that someone does to you. The real benefit/value of being proactive stems from the ability to influence events and outcomes before they ever happen.

Taking Responsibility (It is the true price of greatness). If you want to be great, if you want to be a leader; then you are going to have to be the one to take responsibility for empowering others making decisions. If you ignore this type of responsibility to your downline, then their failure makes you blameworthy or guilty of culpable negligence.

4. Be a Self-Starter Quote:

"I count him braver who overcomes his desires than him who overcomes his enemies, for the hardest victory is victory over self." --Aristotle

Moral: In order to take initiative, we have to push past our own excuses and insecurities. This requires an attitude of accountability, which gives us permission to fill the gaps of wasted time with functional, practical and useful steps to take back our lives.

4. Be a Self-Starter

Requires Two Things:

Being Persistent (A "never give up" attitude). This type of initiative creates involvement (enfold or doing to). Being involved in your business requires you to ensure things are getting done and boxes are being checked (doing your due diligence).

Remaining Curious (A sincere "wanting to understand" nature). This type of initiative creates engagement (interlock or doing with). Being engaged in your business requires you to encourage others to continuously accept and connect to the objectives that will make them successful.

www.AndyAlbright.com

@AndySAlbright

www.NAALeads.com

@NationalAgentsAlliance

@NAALeadsTheWay

#TheAlliance #DotheDo

#N247RU

Jul 1, 2020

On this episode of The Wednesday Call podcast, Andy Albright interviews the top 5 producers this year.

www.AndyAlbright.com

@AndySAlbright

www.NAALeads.com

@NAALeadsTheWay

@NationalAgentsAlliance

#TheAlliance #DoTheDo

#N247RU

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